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While on my Lenten fast from social media, a pair of articles that I wrote was posted on Gifted for Leadership, a subsidiary of Christianity Today that serves women in ministry. A two-part series, these articles were originally posted on March 21 and 25.

Female Anglican priests at the Church of England's Synod meeting in November 2012 await the denomination's decision whether females can be elected bishop. The vote was narrowly defeated. Photo Credit: Telegraph Media Group Limited, copyright 2013.

Female Anglican priests at the Church of England’s Synod meeting in November 2012 await the denomination’s decision whether females can be elected bishop. The vote was narrowly defeated. Photo Credit: Telegraph Media Group Limited, copyright 2013.

Article excerpt: Ministry is a demanding vocation. Ministers, like the Hebrew prophets of old, carry the weight of the presence and word of the Lord and the cares of their people with them at all times. Sometimes nights are restless because ministers do not lay down these holy burdens as they lay themselves down to sleep and pray the Lord their souls to keep. There are few who truly “get” the life and plight of the minister. As much as church members want to “get it” (and maybe believe that they do) and be there for their pastors, they don’t and they cannot.

And as for ministers, as much as they may want to be friends with their congregants, it is not to be because of that “holy distance.” Still very much human, pastoral leaders need friends and accountability partners outside their churches, people to whom they can bear their souls and not hold back.

This is where a minister’s network comes in. And specifically, because ministry does not look the same for brothers and sisters of the cloth and call, female ministers and pastors need other sisters who are walking the same path.

Read more…

Get Thee a Sisterhood, Part 1

Get Thee a Sisterhood, Part 2

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