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No Guilt from "The Happy Introvert"

No Guilt from “The Happy Introvert” (Photo credit: ewagele)

“I see a blind spot in your article.”

Dan, a friend who pastors a church in Rochester, New York, wrote in response to my “Get Thee a Sisterhood” articles posted in March. (Click here to read Part 1, and here to read Part 2.)

“I do affirm the articles’ primary points: the dangers of isolation, that the distinctive demands of pastoral ministry require support from those who understand those demands, that such support should be intentional, and that, for women, the situation is even more distinctive, requiring that women network together,” he said.

“The blind spot is one of extroverts. The kinds of support you describe highlight groups, describing group interaction as the best way for appropriate support to happen. All that is, to an introvert, discomforting.”

Dan and I have engaged this topic several times. We laugh at the parts that we appreciate and love about one another that are completely opposite. These same parts can drive us crazy. Our differences are beyond simply “female stuff” and “male stuff.” I am an extrovert, and Dan is an introvert. These are two dimensions of personality types, and they are grounded in how a person is energized.

This article was posted on Gifted for Leadership while I was on vacation with my family last month. Click here to hop on over to the GFL website, read the rest of the article, and engage with me. See ya there!

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